Greener News

Renewable Energy Clean Tech

Urine: Fuel of the Future?

urine-1
The Royal Society of Chemistry reports that US researchers have developed an efficient way of producing hydrogen from urine – a feat that could not only fuel the cars of the future, but could also help clean up municipal wastewater.

Using hydrogen to power cars has become an increasingly attractive transportation fuel, as the only emission produced is water – but a major stumbling block is the lack of a cheap, renewable source of the fuel. Gerardine Botte of Ohio University may now have found the answer, using an electrolytic approach to produce hydrogen from urine – the most abundant waste on Earth – at a fraction of the cost of producing hydrogen from water.

Read more

May 3, 2012 Posted by | Alternative Energy, Clean Tech, Innovation, Technology | , , , , , | Comments Off on Urine: Fuel of the Future?

A Thirst-Quenching Technology

watermillWhich of these things will happen first: pigs flying, creating water out of thin air, or the Chicago Cubs winning a world series? Some of you might have guessed the third option, but you would be wrong. Steve Bartman, anyone?

Element Four, a small Canadian firm, has applied its water technology to create the WaterMill, a novel electricity-powered machine that draws moisture from the air and purifies it into clean, drinkable water.

In a world where one out of five people are without access to clean drinking water, this new technology could potentially improve the lives of billions of people from third-world countries.

The WaterMill, which retails at $1300, is intended for household use only, but the company is designing a larger version called the WaterWall for the developing world, which would be large enough to supply water to a small village.

It’s early, but the company’s core principle is “to do good as we do well,” CEO Rick Howard says. “That’s part of truly what drives us — knowing that at some point we will be able to do some significant good.”

Read more at CNN online.

July 20, 2009 Posted by | Alternative Energy, Clean Tech, Investment, Ozonated Water, Water | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

From Trash to Treasure

dsc_0752_610x407Next time your boss sees you throwing away his memo, tell him you’re doing it to help the environment. Unload the break room fridge into the garbage, and you’ll power the office for an hour or two. Surely, your hungry co-workers can’t stay mad at you knowing you are just trying to do your part.

IST Energy Corp. has launched its new product, the GEM3T120, a waste-to-energy system in the consumer market that cleanly converts trash into electricity and heat.

Perfect for office buildings, hospitals, and much more, the GEM3T120 can process up to three tons of paper, plastic, food, wood and agricultural materials daily into pellets. At full capacity, the resulting energy from these pellets is enough to power and heat a 200,000 square foot building housing more than 500 people. With no disposal costs for the waste it processes and the energy produced, IST estimates the GEM creates an annual energy cost savings of about $250,000.

The GEM can save consumers big bucks, but the benefits of using the system are not only financial. The GEM is eco-friendly and carbon negative, diminishing greenhouse gases by 540 tons annually. In fact, the system powers itself with the clean energy it produces.

Stu Haber, president and CEO of IST Energy says: “The GEM has created a value for every bag of trash we generate – first by eliminating the need for disposal and then by converting it into energy.”

Read more from livescience.com

July 20, 2009 Posted by | Alternative Energy, Carbon, Clean Tech, renewable energy | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Green Environment Makes for a Green Economy

greenenergyWhat could the United States do with an extra $465 billion? Free healthcare? Free college tuition? Tax cuts? Heck, they could even buy the Yankees. And the best part, not only would the U.S. be saving all that money, they would radically cut CO2 emissions by 80% over the next 40 years, according to a study released by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).

“We have a historic opportunity to reinvent our economy, tackle global warming, and cut energy costs. Setting a limit on heat-trapping emissions would ensure that we make the necessary carbon emission reductions to help avoid the worst consequences of climate change. Combining a carbon cap with strong efficiency, renewable electricity, and transportation standards can deliver those emission cuts and save Americans a substantial amount of money,” says UCS president Kevin Knobloch.

Most of the savings would be on energy bills due to better efficiencies in building and industrial processes, a more efficient transportation system, and cleaner cars. Although a more efficient transportations system and cars would likely cost about $35 billion, drivers would potentially save over $120 billion in fuel costs per year.

“Efficiency and renewable energy technologies are ready today to power our economy with carbon-free electricity. Our blueprint shows that these clean energy sources can lead the way in cutting U.S. emissions, while lowering electricity bills and curbing our addiction to dirty, high-carbon coal power,” says Steve Clemmer, research director of UCS’s Clean Energy Program.

Read more at twilightearth.

July 20, 2009 Posted by | Alternative Energy, Carbon, Clean Tech | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Oregon Tech Powers Up Geothermal Plant on Campus

campusCollege students have long been at the forefront of political and environmental change. The bright young minds at the Oregon Institute of Technology are no different, demanding sustainability efforts put into place by their school.

The Oregon Tech administration finally complied, accommodating their students’ wishes by outlining a plan to build a $7.6 million geothermal power plant on campus.

The plant will become the sole power source for the school in a few years, making Oregon Tech the only university to be powered completely by geothermal energy.

Since Klamath Falls, the home of Oregon Tech, sits near a fault line, heat and energy can be easily extracted from the earth.

In addition, the city of Klamath Falls operates a geothermal heating utility, using the energy to heat buildings, melt snow on the streets, and more.

Read more from cleantechnica.com

July 13, 2009 Posted by | Alternative Energy, Clean Tech, Geothermal, renewable energy | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

U.S. Government Flowing $3 Billion to Renewable Energy Projects

dollar-sign-money-bag-1The U.S. Department of the Treasury and the U.S. Department of Energy on Thursday announced that an estimated US $3 billion will be made available for the development of renewable energy projects around the country and made issued the guidance businesses will need to submit a successful application.

Funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act), the program will provide direct payments in lieu of tax credits in support of an estimated 5,000 bio-mass, solar, wind, and other types of renewable energy production facilities.

Read more

July 11, 2009 Posted by | Alternative Energy, Clean Tech, Investment, renewable energy, Solar, Wind | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Venture Funding for Cleantech on the Rebound

arrow-upThe San Jose Mercury News reports: After two sharp quarterly declines, worldwide venture funding for clean technologies rebounded in the second quarter of 2009 amid rising confidence — particularly in Silicon Valley and throughout California.

From April to June, venture investments in clean tech totaled $1.2 billion across 94 companies, according to preliminary results released Wednesday by The Cleantech Group, a San Francisco research and strategy firm, and Deloitte & Touche.

Read more

July 8, 2009 Posted by | Clean Tech, Technology | , , , , , | Leave a comment

China and India Launch New Solar Energy Projects

solar_power_molten_salt
The Breakthrough Institute reports: While the US mires itself in controversy over the weakened cap-and-trade bill working its way through Congress, China and India have begun to look ahead with new government investment policies that rapidly expand solar power capacity in each country.

China recently announced a dramatic increase in its expected solar capacity target for 2011, planning to reach 2 GW within the next two years. Already, China’s new renewable energy stimulus plan has expanded the nation’s 2020 target from 1.8 GW to 20 GW–that’s more than triple the amount of PV solar power installed in the entire world during 2008, the industry’s best year ever.

The higher targets will be met by enhancing government subsidies and other deployment incentives, which currently stand at US $2.93/watt capacity for roof-mounted systems greater than 50 kW. Government officials have suggested that the current US $.16 per kWH feed-in tariff for ground-mounted PV systems may be adjusted in order to make solar power production profitable.

Last month, India also signaled that it sees solar as a crucial component of a future clean energy economy, when its New and Renewable Energy Committee announced a massive National Solar Mission. In what one Greenpeace India representative called “the most ambitious solar plan that any country has laid out so far,” the National Solar Mission matches China by setting a new target of 20 GW solar capacity by 2020. What’s more, India estimates that the plan could bring the now-prohibitive cost of solar down to US $.08-.10 per kWh by 2017-2020, making it cost-competitive with fossil fuels.

Read more

July 8, 2009 Posted by | Alternative Energy, Clean Tech, Solar | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Eco-Safe Ozonated Water Systems Popular in Restaurants, Food Processing and now the Golf Industry

2400836609_219cc14610Eco-Safe Systems USA(OTC: ESFS), a leader in the development and installation of ozonated water systems for the restaurant and food processing industries, is now developing ozonated water systems for golf courses.

They’ve just announced excellent results from independent testing of soil samples from a Los Angeles Golf Course utilizing Eco-Safe Ozone Turf Treatment.

Michael Elliot, President of Eco-Safe, stated, “Golf courses are a perfect fit for ozonated water treatment due to the wide range of benefits provided by ozone and the ease of application. Fundamentally, ozonated water percolates more deeply and rapidly, providing up to a 15% reduction in water usage, and the extra oxygen dissolved in the water is tremendously beneficial to the grass. Turf irrigated with ozonated water develops better color and a deeper root system.”

Elliot continued, “The need for chemicals and fertilizer is reduced, and ozone kills fungi and bacteria dangerous to grass. The ability of ozone to remediate low quality water also benefits those golf courses forced to use reclaimed water for irrigation. We feel the final tests will provide us with superb marketing material to develop this huge market for our Eco-Safe Systems.”

July 8, 2009 Posted by | Clean Tech, Ozonated Water | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Empire State Building Gets An Energy Efficiency Retrofit

photo_lg_newyork_ctyWhat once was the world’s tallest building, the Empire State Building is undergoing a $500 million eco-friendly makeover that will cut energy consumption nearly 40% in the next three years. The famous New York City landmark is the test case for a new process of analyzing and retrofitting existing structures for environmental sustainability, which will provide a replicable model for similar projects around the world.

The program is being spearheaded by former President Bill Clinton’s Clinton Climate Initiative, as well as the Rocky Mountain Institute, Johnson Controls Inc. and Jones Lang LaSalle.

“In this distressed economic climate, there is a tremendous opportunity for cities and building owners to retrofit existing buildings to save money and save energy,” Mr. Clinton said today.

On the outside, the building will get 6,500 windows refurbished into triple-glazed insulated modules, dramatically improving summer and winter efficiency. On the inside, the 78 year-old building is getting upgraded lighting, lighting controls and lighting design; upgraded or overhauled furnaces, chillers, and air-handlers. There will also be an emphasis put on demand-side management systems, allowing tenants to use their energy efficiently.

“Commercial and residential buildings account for the majority of the total carbon footprint of cities around the world – over 70 percent in New York City,” said Anthony E. Malkin of building owner, Empire State Building Company. “Most new buildings are built with the environment in mind, but the real key to substantial progress is reducing existing building energy consumption and carbon footprint.”

Read more at cleantechnica.com

July 3, 2009 Posted by | Alternative Energy, Clean Tech, Innovation, Technology | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment